YOU LOVE ADVENTURES. YOU LOVE SHOOTING VIDEOS.
AND YOU SHARE YOUR PASSION WITH THE WORLD. SO DO WE.

LUUV is a hand-held camera stabilizer for action cameras and smartphones that enables you to tape all your adventures shake-free.

Tobias can’t wait to ship the first goodies to you! #merchandise #style #fashion #clothes #snapback #betahaus

Tobias can’t wait to ship the first goodies to you! #merchandise #style #fashion #clothes #snapback #betahaus

We rocked @toghmudder and steady filming with our camera stabilizer LUUV for all action cams. #running #freerunning #sport #dirt #mudd #toughmudder #beet #gopro #goprohero #filmmaking

We rocked @toghmudder and steady filming with our camera stabilizer LUUV for all action cams. #running #freerunning #sport #dirt #mudd #toughmudder #beet #gopro #goprohero #filmmaking

Germany won the soccer world championship 2014. Check out the limited edition of our worldcup stabilizer LUUV with the fitting gymbag. #GERARG #worldcup #wm2014 #champion #Brazil #gopro #filming #steadycam #LUUV #soccer #Germany

Germany won the soccer world championship 2014. Check out the limited edition of our worldcup stabilizer LUUV with the fitting gymbag. #GERARG #worldcup #wm2014 #champion #Brazil #gopro #filming #steadycam #LUUV #soccer #Germany

We spend one weekend in Nürnberg as the official video partner for the @UrbanianRun. Check out our video filmed steady with our camera stabilizer LUUV and @GoPro. Preorder your LUUV now www.luuv-is-awesome.com
#gopro #goprohero #goprohero3 #parkour #freerunning #jogging #running #fun #sport #action #obstacle #gopromoment #goproimages #goprovideos #funsport #training #urbabianrun #drone #dronegear #car #jumping

#3 TalkOnThursday with trial bike rider Martin Pretorius

image

The wind whirs through the wheels, the sun is sparkling on his frames. While looking to the ground, Martin rides slowly towards the wall clutching the handle bar tight. Suddenly, the muscles of his upper arm contract, a jolt goes straight through his body, lifts him up and for seconds he seems to be floating.

Shortly after, the rear wheel hits the edge of the concrete step. He freezes. Like a horseman Martin remains for a few seconds in a triumphant pose. With a smirk he circles the obstacle once again, then turns around quickly while riding away before he starts looking for the next challenge. 

Martin Pretorius is a trail biker. He started very early during his childhood in Pretoria, South Africa – a town that can often be very sticky due to its low-lying geographic position. This might be one of the reasons for his stamina since his way of finally ending up in Berlin has been a very hard one. He started his career on an old girls’ bike which was perfectly suitable to be used as a trail bike due to its size. The frame of his first trial bike was hanging on the wall of his room for three months before he considered trying it out. Many bikes and stopovers all over the world later, Martin currently lives in Berlin where we met up to capture his incredible talent and skills with LUUV.

What’s the difference between a trail bike and a normal bike? 

Well! It has changed a lot over the years. I started out on a normal cross country mountain bike witch was huge and not really built for riding trials. But the most obvious difference is the low slung frame of a trials bike to give you space to maneuver your body around the bike. A lot of them are designed without a seat or a seat post these days - once again for maneuverability purposes. The Gearing of these bikes are also very light so you can get up onto obstacles I wouldn’t suggest riding the” tour de france” on one of these. Wide handlebars, broad rims with big holes to save weight, and rigid forks, that’s a Trials bike.

How important has trial biking become for you?

Trials has become a lifestyle for me - a way of living. It changed my perspective on how I see every day objects, for example: park benches hand railings, rocks, power boxes – any thing really. To other people its everyday objects and it goes by unnoticed. I see a piece of art coming alive right in front of me when I look at it. I’ve become so obsessive with riding my bike in strange ways, that even when I’m without my bike I find myself walking past things and picturing myself on my bike riding these things (obstacles). Trials for me has become a way of express myself. It’s a really healthy sport but I see it more as an art form than a sport. The exercise is an extra benefit.

Which aspect about trial biking inspires you the most?

I would say the creativity behind it. You have say for example 5 obstacles and a thousand ways to make your way over or/and around them! Your own mind and Physical ability are the only things that can hold you back. Sometimes you would be out on the bike and make a mistake that leads you into another idea, or open up another possibility that you didn’t think of before! Sometimes doing something you haven’t done before can give you a real adrenalin rush or, nailing a difficult trial for the 1st time after trying it more than 50 times can be really rewarding.

What are particular challenges when trial biking?

It’s overcoming an obstacle and in some cases not just overcoming the obstacle but how you concurred it. It’s all about making it look easy and as smooth as possible, aggressive but light as a feather at the same time “Smooth like a butterfly, sting like a bee !” It’s got a lot to do with problem solving! Some obstacles throw you of like a horse gone mad! A bit of planning and changing your approach can concur the beast.

How did you explore trial biking for yourself?

I was always riding my bicycle to school and back, and after a while I started mountain biking with friends, but it wasn’t until I saw a guy called Petr Kraus on TV that I said “Wow, that looks awesome - I have to learn to do that”! After Petr I got inspired by so many other riders that I ended up spending most of my time in parks, trying to ride my bike over park benches, rocks and wooden logs more and more. I started mountain biking less and less and riding trials more and more.

Is there a place where you would love to ride someday?

I just got back from Spain seeing some of the most awesome obstacles and lines to be ridden that I’ve ever seen in my life! Another amazing spot would be the Holocaust Memorial in Berlin. Sorry no disrespect, but if you see these massive concrete slabs they’re just begging to be ridden.

Is there something you’d you like to try out someday?

There’s not any specific thing I would like to try but I would definitely like to put a road trip together with some of my favourite trials riders. In a group the creativity can reach an insane level! Every one inspire each other to go bigger smoother and more ridiculous through watching each other ride. It’s like a friendly competition. You don’t want to end up pulling the loser tricks of the day. That’s when you start pulling things out of the “magic-hat” that you never knew you had in there before.

What has been your most fascinating experience until now?

Probably the time I was living in England. The thing that made it special was meeting a lot of my Trial Hero’s and actually riding with them. A lot of them were my childhood heroes whom I read so much about. Another Experience I will never forget is entertaining people in trial demo’s back in South Africa and in England. It’s nice entertaining people and hearing them take a deep gulp of air, thinking you might hurt yourself.

image

What’s the trial bike scene like in Germany?

To be honest, I don’t really have to much contact with the trials scene here in Germany. I’m a bit more of a lone rider most of the time. I have a few friends who go out with me for a day of riding laughing and fun in the sun. What I have noticed about the German Trials scene is that lots of the Germans focus there riding towards competition style riding, which I find from a creative point of view a bit too restrictive. But that’s just silly me!

Which development do you hope for to happen in the future?

Oh! I hope that in the future Doctors will be able to regrow new legs, backs and arms. So I can still ride trials when I turn 80 years old or something that reverses the ageing process.

Assuming you wouldn’t be able to ride a trial bike ever again – what would you do?

That’s hard to say. I’m such a hyper-active person that I can’t imagine myself sitting around doing nothing. If I can still move my limbs I will continue playing my drums (I’m playing drums when I’m not riding my bike). But to answer the question, I will probably find something to keep me busy, but I will miss trials dearly if it’s taken away from me!

Have you experienced problems when filming Trials?

I Do! When we’re out riding we have guys with cameras but everyone wants to ride instead of filming. Getting stable footage is another problem. The biggest problem is finding people to film you. This was a dream come true teaming up with LUUV and making a video. It’s something I always had in the back of my mind but never knew the people to help me realize such a project. I hope there’s going to be more to come.

Which aspect does one have to pay attention to when filming Trial Biker?

I think the most important thing when it comes to the filming of trials is to give the viewer a good perspective of the obstacles we ride. The height, the distance of the gaps and just having a creative eye. In so many videos the perspective of a move gets lost in translation because the camera was too close to the rider or too far or even the angle can make a big difference. And then having a steady hand like I said makes it look so much more professional. That’s where LUUV comes in to play. Thanks!

#3 TalkOnThursday mit Trial Bike Rider Martin Pretorius

image

Der Wind surrt zwischen den Rädern, die Sonne blitzt im Gestell der Brille. Langsam fährt Martin auf die Wand zu, den Blick auf den Boden gerichtet, die Hände den Lenker fest umgriffen. Plötzlich spannen sich die Oberarme an, die Muskeln treten unter der Haut hervor, als ein Ruck seinen Körper durchströmt, der ihn in die Luft hebt und kurzerhand schweben lässt.

Kurze Zeit später trifft das Hinterrad auf die Kante der Betonstufe. Stillstand. Wie ein Reiter auf seinem Ross verharrt Martin für wenige Sekunden in triumphierender Pose.

Dann zeichnet sich ein schüchternes Lächeln auf seinem Gesicht ab als er um den Betonklotz fährt und dem Hindernis noch einmal nachblickt bevor sein Blick sich auf die Suche nach einem neuen begibt.

Martin Pretorius fährt Trial. Angefangen hat er damit früh. Seit seiner Kindheit in Pretoria, Südafrika, einer Stadt, in der die Hitze aufgrund der tiefen Lage tagelang steht. Das erklärt auch die Ausdauer, die Martin beim Fahren zeigt, denn sein Weg war mehr als beschwerlich und führte ihn über unzählige Weg schließlich nach Berlin. Seine Karriere begann mit einem alten Mädchenfahrrad, das mehrmals modifiziert wurde und  wegen der geringen Größe ideal für Trial geeignet war. Der Rahmen seines ersten Trial-Bikes hing 3 Monate an der Wand seines Kindeszimmers, bevor Martin zum ersten Mal darauf fuhr. Nach mehren Fahrrädern und Zwischenstopps überall auf der Welt wie in London beispielsweise, lebt Martin in Berlin, wo wir ihn trafen und sein Talent mit LUUV wackelfrei einfingen.

 Was unterscheidet ein Trials-Bike von einem normalen Fahrrad?

Nun ja, es hat sich in den vergangenen Jahren viel verändert. Ich habe auf einem gewöhnlichen Geländerad begonnen, was eigentlich viel zu groß für Trail Biking war. Der deutlich sichtbarste Unterschied ist der niedrige Rahmen eines Trial Bikes, der Dir den Platz gibt, Deinen Körper auf dem Rad zu bewegen. Viele Trial Bikes haben heutzutage keinen Sattel mehr – ebenfalls um bessere Beweglichkeit zu ermöglichen. Die Übersetzung ist auch sehr leichtgängig, so dass man auf die Hindernisse rauf kommt. Ausladende Lenker, große Felgen mit Löchern, um Geweicht zu sparen und starre Gabeln machen ein Trail Bike aus.

Was bedeutet für dich Trial-Bike fahren?

Trial ist wirklich eine Lebensart für mich geworden. Es hat meine Wahrnehmung von alltäglichen Dingen geändert wie zum Beispiel von Parkbänken, Geländern, Felsen, Stromkästen – von wirklich vielen solcher Dinge. Für andere Leute sind dies banale Objekte, an denen sie vorbeigehen, ohne sie aktiv wahrzunehmen. Für mich aber sind sie wie Kunstwerke, die lebendig werden, wenn ich sie ansehe. Ich bin regelrecht besessen davon, mit meinem Trial verrückte Wege auszuprobieren, dass ich mich sogar dann, wenn ich mal ohne Rad unterwegs bin, dabei ertappe wie ich mir vorstelle, über verschiedene Hindernisse mit dem Trial zu fahren. Trial Biking ist für mich ein Weg geworden, meine Persönlichkeit auszudrücken. Ich sehe es mehr als eine Kunstform, denn als eine Sportart. Das Trainieren ist ein schöner Nebeneffekt.

Was begeistert Dich besonders am Trial?

Ich würde sagen, die Kreativität, die das Ausüben der Sportart erfordert. Zum Beispiel gibt es für Hindernisse unzählige Möglichkeiten über diese zu springen oder diese zu umfahren. Nur Deine mentalen und physischen Fähigkeiten können Dich zurückhalten.

Manchmal, wenn Du unterwegs bist mit dem Rad und einen Fehler machst, bringt dieser Dich erst wieder auf eine neue Idee, auf die Du vorher gar nicht gekommen wärst. Etwas auszuprobieren, was Du vorher noch nicht versucht hast, kann Dir manchmal einen richtigen Adrenalinkick geben und eine Sequenz nach 50 Versuchen zum ersten Mal zu meistern kann ungemein befriedigend sein.

Was sind die speziellen Herausforderungen beim Trial?

Es geht darum, Hindernisse zu meistern und in manchen Fällen zählt nicht nur das Ergebnis, sondern auch die Art und Weise. Es geht darum, es so einfach und mühelos wie möglich aussehen zu lassen. Aggressiv, aber gleichzeitig leicht wie eine Feder nach dem Motto “Elegant wie ein Schmetterling, der zusticht wie einen Biene”. Es hat viel damit zu tun, Probleme zu lösen – einige Hindernisse sind wie ein Bock, der Dich immer wieder zur Verzweiflung treibt. Ein bisschen Planung und Anpassungen der Herangehensweise können das Biest zähmen.

Wie bist du zum Trialsfahren gekommen?

Ich bin früher immer mit dem Fahrrad zur Schule und zurück nach Hause gefahren und nach einer Weile habe ich zusammen mit Freunden mit Mountainbiking angefangen, nachdem ich den Profi Petr Kraus im Fernsehen gesehen hatte und mir dachte: „Wow, das sieht cool aus, das muss ich auch lernen!“ Nach Petr habe ich mich noch von vielen weiteren Fahrern inspirieren lassen und verbrachte den Großteil meiner Zeit in Parks, um zu üben wie ich mit dem Rad über Parkbänke, Felsen oder Baumstämme komme. Ich fing an, immer öfter Trials zu fahren und weniger Mountainbike.

Wo würdest du gerne mal fahren?

Ich bin gerade erst aus Spanien zurück und habe einige der abgefahrensten Hindernisse und Streckenverläufe meines Lebens gesehen. Ein weiterer geeigneter Spot wäre das Holocaust Mahnmal in Berlin. Ich will auf keinen Fall irgendwem zu Nahe treten, aber solche massiven Betonstelen wären ideal fürs Trial Biking.

Was würdest du gerne mal ausprobieren?

Es gibt nichts Spezielles, aber ich würde definitive gerne mal einen Roadtrip mit einigen meiner Lieblings Trial Biker unternehmen. In einer Gruppe kennt die Kreativität keine Grenzen! Jeder inspiriert den anderen, immer größere, elegantere und krankere Sachen auszuprobieren. Es ist wie ein freundschaftlicher Wettbewerb! Du willst nicht als derjenige enden, der die billigsten Tricks gezeigt hat. Das veranlasst Dich dazu, Dinge aus dem „Zauberhut zu ziehen“, die Du noch nie vorher versucht hast.

Was war dein faszinierendstes Erlebnis?

Wahrscheinlich die Zeit, in der ich in England gelebt habe. Die Erlebnisse, die diese Zeit so besonders gemacht haben, waren sicherlich die Treffen mit meinen Trials-Vorbildern und die Gelegenheit, tatsächlich mit ihnen zu fahren. Viele von ihnen waren die Helden meiner Kindheit, über die ich so viel gelesen hatte. Eine weitere Erfahrung, die ich nie vergessen werde, war die Gelegenheit, Leute auf Trials-Veranstaltungen in Südafrika und England zu unterhalten. Das hat richtig Spaß gemacht und es ist ein tolles Gefühl, wenn Du die Leute richtiggehend tief Luft holen hörst, weil sie Angst haben, Du könntest Dich verletzten.

image

Wie ist die Trial Szene in Deutschland? 

Um ehrlich zu sein, habe ich gar nicht viel Kontakt zur deutschen Trial Bike Szene. Ich bin eher alleine unterwegs. Ich habe ein paar Freunde, mit denen ich raus gehe zum Fahren und Spaß haben. Was ich bemerkt habe ist, dass viele aus der deutschen Trials Szene sich auf das Fahren in Wettbewerben fokussieren, was ich aus kreativer Sicht etwas zu einschränkend finde. Aber das ist meine persönliche Ansicht.

Welche Entwicklung erhoffst du dir für die Zukunft?

Oh! Ich hoffe, dass Ärzte in Zukunft in der Lage sein werden, Beine, Rücken und Arme „nachwachsen“ zu lassen oder zumindest etwas entwickeln, was den Alterungsprozess aufhält, sodass ich mit 80 Jahren immer noch fahren kann.

Was würdest du machen, wenn du nie wieder Trials fahren könntest?

Das ist schwer zu sagen! Ich bin so eine hyperaktive Person, dass ich mir nicht vorstellen kann, rumzusitzen und nichts zu tun. Wenn ich meine Gliedmaßen noch bewegen kann, würde ich auf jeden Fall Schlagzeug spielen (was ich immer dann mache, wenn ich nicht Trials fahre). Aber, um die Frage zu beantworten, ich würde sicherlich eine Beschäftigung finden,aber Trial Biking schmerzlich vermissen.

Hast du Probleme beim Filmen von Trials?

In der Tat! Wenn wir draußen sind um zu fahren, will jeder lieber fahren als filmen. Ein weiteres Problem ist, wackelfreie Aufnahmen zu bekommen. Das größte Problem ist aber, Leute zu finden, die Dich filmen wollen. Daher ist ein Traum wahr geworden, mit LUUV zusammenzuarbeiten und das Video zu drehen! Dies war etwas, was ich immer schon machen wollte, aber nie jemanden gefunden haben, der so ein Projekt realisiert.  Ich hoffe, dass sich noch mehr in dieser Hinsicht ergibt.

Worauf ist beim Filmen des Sports besonders zu achten?

Ich denke, der wichtigste Aspekt ist, dem Zuschauer eine gute Sicht auf die Hindernisse zu ermöglichen – auf die Höhe, die Entfernung der Lücken und dem kreativen Blick Raum zu lassen. In vielen Videos ist die Perspektive auf den Trick unvorteilhaft, da die Kamera entweder zu nah oder zu weit weg platziert oder räumlich schlecht positioniert wurde. Wackelfrei sieht natürlich alles so viel professioneller aus – und hier kommt LUUV ins Spiel. Vielen Dank!

Wir danken ebenfalls für das Interview, Martin!

As the official video partner of the @urbanianrun with our  camera stabilzer LUUV we got an own obstacle. #parkour #freerunning #jogging #running #urbanianrun #sport #action #stunt #filming #cars #teamLUUV #LUUV

As the official video partner of the @urbanianrun with our camera stabilzer LUUV we got an own obstacle. #parkour #freerunning #jogging #running #urbanianrun #sport #action #stunt #filming #cars #teamLUUV #LUUV

We spent one day with Martin on his trial bike and filmed all these adventures shake-free with our 3d printed plug & play stabilizer for all action cams and smartphones. Filmed with @GoPro and #BraunMaster. Preorder your LUUV now www.luuv-is-awesome.com Like us on fb.com/teamLUUV #gopro #goprohero #gopromoment #goprovid #goprooftheday #goprohero #goprohero3 #braunmaster #actioncam #berlin #trial #funsport #action #instavid #bike #stunt #jump #stabilizer #steadycam #steadicam #3dprinted #3dprinting #filming #filmmaking

One step further with our packaging design for LUUV - stabilzer for all action cams and smartphones. Thanks to Tony and Christoph of CEPAQ. Stay tuned its gonna be awesome. #design #packaging #style #stabilzer #gopro #actionpro #LUUV

One step further with our packaging design for LUUV - stabilzer for all action cams and smartphones. Thanks to Tony and Christoph of CEPAQ. Stay tuned its gonna be awesome. #design #packaging #style #stabilzer #gopro #actionpro #LUUV